Document
Table of Contents

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
______________________________________________________________________________ 
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
þ
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2018
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     
Commission file number 001-08604
http://api.tenkwizard.com/cgi/image?quest=1&rid=23&ipage=12401017&doc=12
TEAM, INC.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
 
 
 
Delaware
 
74-1765729
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
13131 Dairy Ashford, Suite 600, Sugar Land, Texas
 
77478
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
(Zip Code)
 
 
 
(281) 331-6154
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
 
 
 
None
(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes  þ    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  þ    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
 
¨
    
Accelerated filer
 
þ
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
¨
 
Smaller reporting company
 
¨
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Emerging growth company
 
¨
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.    ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).     Yes  ¨     No  þ
The Registrant had 30,021,570 shares of common stock, par value $0.30, outstanding as of August 3, 2018.
 


Table of Contents

INDEX
 
 
 
Page No.
 
 
 
 
 


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PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
ITEM 1.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
TEAM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands, except share and per share data)
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
15,296

 
$
26,552

Receivables, net of allowance of $15,352 and $11,308
323,169

 
301,963

Inventory
52,495

 
49,703

Income tax receivable

 
892

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
30,418

 
17,950

Total current assets
421,378

 
397,060

Property, plant and equipment, net
195,762

 
203,219

Intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization of $68,230 and $54,184
145,781

 
160,161

Goodwill
283,090

 
284,804

Other assets, net
6,617

 
5,798

Deferred income taxes
5,462

 
4,793

Total assets
$
1,058,090

 
$
1,055,835

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
51,813

 
$
55,312

Other accrued liabilities
94,843

 
92,472

Income taxes payable
742

 

Total current liabilities
147,398

 
147,784

Deferred income taxes
42,302

 
38,100

Long-term debt
390,481

 
387,749

Defined benefit pension liability
12,725

 
14,976

Other long-term liabilities
9,053

 
9,758

Total liabilities
601,959

 
598,367

Commitments and contingencies

 

Equity:
 
 
 
Preferred stock, 500,000 shares authorized, none issued

 

Common stock, par value $0.30 per share, 60,000,000 shares authorized; 30,019,135 and 29,953,041 shares issued
9,004

 
8,984

Additional paid-in capital
396,800

 
352,500

Retained earnings
73,901

 
115,780

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(23,574
)
 
(19,796
)
Total equity
456,131

 
457,468

Total liabilities and equity
$
1,058,090

 
$
1,055,835

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

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TEAM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
Revenues
$
343,889

 
$
312,256

 
$
646,274

 
$
598,810

Operating expenses
246,707

 
227,613

 
473,558

 
439,363

Gross margin
97,182

 
84,643

 
172,716

 
159,447

Selling, general and administrative expenses
93,174

 
91,065

 
182,833

 
180,378

Restructuring and other related charges (credits), net
2,411

 
271

 
2,411

 
(976
)
Gain on revaluation of contingent consideration
(202
)
 

 
(202
)
 
(1,174
)
Operating income (loss)
1,799

 
(6,693
)
 
(12,326
)
 
(18,781
)
Interest expense, net
7,631

 
4,372

 
15,228

 
7,530

Loss on convertible debt embedded derivative (see Note 8)
29,330

 

 
24,783

 

Other expense, net
285

 
17

 
332

 
358

Loss before income taxes
(35,447
)
 
(11,082
)
 
(52,669
)
 
(26,669
)
Less: Provision (benefit) for income taxes
(2,977
)
 
4

 
(2,354
)
 
(6,075
)
Net loss
$
(32,470
)
 
$
(11,086
)
 
$
(50,315
)
 
$
(20,594
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loss per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
(1.08
)
 
$
(0.37
)
 
$
(1.68
)
 
$
(0.69
)
Diluted
$
(1.08
)
 
$
(0.37
)
 
$
(1.68
)
 
$
(0.69
)
 






See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

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TEAM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF
COMPREHENSIVE LOSS
(in thousands)
 
 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
Net loss
$
(32,470
)
 
$
(11,086
)
 
$
(50,315
)
 
$
(20,594
)
Other comprehensive income (loss) before tax:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment
(4,809
)
 
4,448

 
(4,935
)
 
6,556

Foreign currency hedge
788

 
(949
)
 
367

 
(1,115
)
Amortization of net actuarial loss on defined benefit pension plans

 
17

 

 
34

Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax
(4,021
)
 
3,516

 
(4,568
)
 
5,475

Tax (provision) benefit attributable to other comprehensive income (loss)
560

 
(782
)
 
790

 
(1,230
)
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
(3,461
)
 
2,734

 
(3,778
)
 
4,245

Total comprehensive loss
$
(35,931
)
 
$
(8,352
)
 
$
(54,093
)
 
$
(16,349
)
 
 
See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.


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TEAM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(in thousands)
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
Cash flows from operating activities:

 

Net loss
$
(50,315
)
 
$
(20,594
)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
32,434

 
26,015

Amortization of deferred loan costs and debt discount
3,416

 
353

Provision for doubtful accounts
5,567

 
3,172

Foreign currency loss
1,037

 
437

Deferred income taxes
(3,700
)
 
(9,066
)
Gain on revaluation of contingent consideration
(202
)
 
(1,174
)
Gain on asset disposal
(912
)
 
(921
)
Loss on convertible debt embedded derivative
24,783

 

Non-cash compensation cost
7,006

 
4,263

Other, net
(1,951
)
 
(2,243
)
(Increase) decrease:
 
 
 
Receivables
(29,361
)
 
(17,896
)
Inventory
(3,502
)
 
(1,297
)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
(4,250
)
 
1,857

Increase (decrease):
 
 
 
Accounts payable
(3,181
)
 
(1,708
)
Other accrued liabilities
4,873

 
5,509

Income taxes
511

 
683

Net cash used in operating activities
(17,747
)
 
(12,610
)
Cash flows from investing activities:

 

Capital expenditures
(12,082
)
 
(18,662
)
Proceeds from disposal of assets
1,463

 
2,558

Other
(483
)
 
(508
)
Net cash used in investing activities
(11,102
)
 
(16,612
)
Cash flows from financing activities:

 

Net borrowings under revolving credit agreement
21,168

 
22,488

Payments under term loan

 
(10,000
)
Contingent consideration payments
(1,106
)
 
(1,278
)
Debt issuance costs on Credit Facility
(855
)
 
(738
)
Issuance of common stock from share-based payment arrangements

 
449

Payments related to withholding tax for share-based payment arrangements
(225
)
 
(302
)
Net cash provided by financing activities
18,982

 
10,619

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash
(1,389
)
 
1,541

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents
(11,256
)
 
(17,062
)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
26,552

 
46,216

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
$
15,296

 
$
29,154


See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

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TEAM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND PRACTICES
Description of business. Unless otherwise indicated, the terms “Team, Inc.,” “Team,” “the Company,” “we,” “our” and “us” are used in this report to refer to Team, Inc., to one or more of our consolidated subsidiaries or to all of them taken as a whole.
We are a leading provider of standard to specialty industrial services, including inspection, engineering assessment and mechanical repair and remediation required in maintaining high temperature and high pressure piping systems and vessels that are utilized extensively in the refining, petrochemical, power, pipeline and other heavy industries. We conduct operations in three segments: Inspection and Heat Treating Group (“IHT”) (formerly TeamQualspec), Mechanical Services Group (“MS”) (formerly TeamFurmanite) and Quest Integrity Group (“Quest Integrity”).
IHT provides standard and advanced non-destructive testing (“NDT”) services for the process, pipeline and power sectors, pipeline integrity management services, field heat treating services, as well as associated engineering and assessment services. These services can be offered while facilities are running (on-stream), during facility turnarounds or during new construction or expansion activities.
MS provides primarily call-out and turnaround services under both on-stream and off-line/shut down circumstances. Turnaround services are project-related and demand is a function of the number and scope of scheduled and unscheduled facility turnarounds as well as new industrial facility construction or expansion activities. The turnaround and call-out services MS provides include field machining, technical bolting, field valve repair and isolation test plugging services. On-stream services offered by MS represent the services offered while plants are operating and under pressure. These services include leak repair, fugitive emissions control and hot tapping.
Quest Integrity provides integrity and reliability management solutions for the process, pipeline and power sectors. These solutions encompass two broadly-defined disciplines: (1) highly specialized in-line inspection services for unpiggable process piping and pipelines using proprietary in-line inspection tools and analytical software; and (2) advanced condition assessment services through a multi-disciplined engineering team.
We offer these services globally through over 200 locations in 20 countries throughout the world with more than 7,300 employees. We market our services to companies in a diverse array of heavy industries which include the petrochemical, refining, power, pipeline, steel, pulp and paper industries, as well as municipalities, shipbuilding, original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”), distributors, and some of the world’s largest engineering and construction firms.
Basis for presentation. These interim financial statements are unaudited, but in the opinion of our management, reflect all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of results for such periods. The condensed consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2017 is derived from the December 31, 2017 audited consolidated financial statements. The results of operations for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of results for the full year. Certain disclosures have been condensed or omitted from the interim financial statements included in this report. Therefore, these financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto contained in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017.
Use of estimates. Our accounting policies conform to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States (“GAAP”). The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and judgments that affect our reported financial position and results of operations. We review significant estimates and judgments affecting our consolidated financial statements on a recurring basis and record the effect of any necessary adjustments prior to their publication. Estimates and judgments are based on information available at the time such estimates and judgments are made. Adjustments made with respect to the use of these estimates and judgments often relate to information not previously available. Uncertainties with respect to such estimates and judgments are inherent in the preparation of financial statements. Estimates and judgments are used in, among other things, (1) aspects of revenue recognition, (2) valuation of acquisition related tangible and intangible assets and assessments of all long-lived assets for possible impairment, (3) estimating various factors used to accrue liabilities for workers’ compensation, auto, medical and general liability, (4) establishing an allowance for uncollectible accounts receivable, (5) estimating the useful lives of our assets, (6) assessing future tax exposure and the realization of tax assets, (7) the valuation of the embedded derivative liability in our convertible debt and (8) selecting assumptions used in the measurement of costs and liabilities associated with defined benefit pension plans.
Fair value of financial instruments. Our financial instruments consist primarily of cash, cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and debt obligations. The carrying amount of cash, cash equivalents, trade accounts receivable and trade accounts payable are representative of their respective fair values due to the short-term maturity of these instruments. The

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fair value of our credit facility is representative of the carrying value based upon the variable terms and management’s opinion that the current rates available to us with the same maturity and security structure are equivalent to that of the banking facility. The fair value of our convertible senior notes as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 is $293.3 million and $231.6 million, respectively (inclusive of the fair value of the conversion option) and is a “Level 2” (as defined in Note 10) measurement, determined based on the observed trading price of these instruments.

Goodwill and intangible assets. Goodwill and intangible assets acquired in a business combination and determined to have an indefinite useful life are not amortized, but are instead tested for impairment at least annually in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 350 Intangibles—Goodwill and Other (“ASC 350”). Intangible assets with estimated useful lives are amortized over their respective estimated useful lives to their estimated residual values and reviewed for impairment in accordance with ASC 350. We assess goodwill for impairment at the reporting unit level, which we have determined to be the same as our operating segments. Each reporting unit has goodwill relating to past acquisitions.
Our goodwill annual test date is December 1. We measure goodwill impairment losses as the amount by which the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. We performed our most recent annual impairment test as of December 1, 2017 and concluded that there was no impairment based upon a qualitative assessment to determine if it was more likely than not (that is, a likelihood of more than 50 percent) that the fair values of the reporting units were less than their respective carrying values as of the reporting date. There have been no events that have required an interim assessment of the carrying value of goodwill during 2018.
There was $283.1 million and $284.8 million of goodwill at June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. A rollforward of goodwill for the six months ended June 30, 2018 is as follows (in thousands):
 
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
IHT
 
MS
 
Quest
Integrity
 
Total
Balance at beginning of period
$
194,211

 
$
56,600

 
$
33,993

 
$
284,804

Foreign currency adjustments
(905
)
 
(390
)
 
(419
)
 
(1,714
)
Balance at end of period
$
193,306

 
$
56,210

 
$
33,574

 
$
283,090

There was $75.2 million of accumulated impairment losses at June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, comprised of $21.1 million and $54.1 million for IHT and MS, respectively, which relate to impairment losses recognized in the third quarter of 2017.
Income taxes. The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “2017 Tax Act”) was enacted on December 22, 2017 and represents a significant change to the United States (“U.S.”) corporate income tax system including: a federal corporate rate reduction from 35% to 21%; limitations on the deductibility of interest expense and executive compensation; creation of new minimum taxes such as the base erosion anti-abuse tax (“BEAT”) and Global Intangible Low Taxed Income (“GILTI”) tax; and the transition of U.S. international taxation from a worldwide tax system to a modified territorial tax system, which will result in a one-time U.S. tax liability on those earnings that have not previously been repatriated to the U.S.
Due to the complexities involved in accounting for the 2017 Tax Act, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission issued Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118 (“SAB 118”), which requires companies include in their financial statements reasonable estimates of the impacts of the 2017 Tax Act to the extent such reasonable estimates have been determined. Under SAB 118, companies are allowed a measurement period of up to one year after the enactment date of the 2017 Tax Act to finalize the recording of the related tax impacts. Accordingly, the Company previously recorded certain reasonable estimates of the tax impact in its consolidated statement of operations for the fourth quarter of 2017. As of year ended December 31, 2017, we had not yet completed our accounting for the income tax effects of certain elements of the 2017 Tax Act, including the new GILTI and BEAT taxes. Due to the complexity of these new tax rules, we continue to evaluate the provisions of the 2017 Tax Act and will record any resulting adjustments to our provisional estimates initially made during the fourth quarter of 2017, during the remainder of 2018, which may materially impact our income tax expense (benefit). Starting in the first quarter of 2018, we have recorded the GILTI tax as a current period expense as incurred. No adjustments to the provisional estimates determined as of December 31, 2017 were recorded during the three or six months ended June 30, 2018.
The effective tax rate was 4.5% for the six months ended June 30, 2018, compared to 22.8% for the six months ended June 30, 2017. The decrease in the effective tax rate was primarily due to increases in valuation allowances on deferred tax assets related

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to both U.S. net operating losses and recently enacted interest expense limitation carryovers under the 2017 Tax Act. The effective tax rate for the six months ended June 30, 2018 also reflects the reduced federal corporate income tax rate that resulted from the enactment of the 2017 Tax Act in December 2017.
Allowance for doubtful accounts. In the ordinary course of business, a portion of our accounts receivable are not collected due to billing disputes, customer bankruptcies, dissatisfaction with the services we performed and other various reasons. We establish an allowance to account for those accounts receivable that we estimate will eventually be deemed uncollectible. The allowance for doubtful accounts is based on a combination of our historical experience and management’s review of long outstanding accounts receivable.
Concentration of credit risk. No single customer accounts for more than 10% of consolidated revenues.
Earnings (loss) per share. Basic earnings (loss) per share is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to Team stockholders by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the year. Diluted earnings (loss) per share is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to Team stockholders by the sum of (1) the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period, (2) the dilutive effect of the assumed exercise of share-based compensation using the treasury stock method and (3) the dilutive effect of the assumed conversion of our convertible senior notes under the treasury stock method. The Company’s intent is to settle the principal amount of the convertible senior notes in cash upon conversion. If the conversion value exceeds the principal amount, the Company may elect to deliver shares of its common stock with respect to the remainder of its conversion obligation in excess of the aggregate principal amount (the “conversion spread”). Accordingly, the conversion spread is included in the denominator for the computation of diluted earnings per common share using the treasury stock method and the numerator is adjusted for any recorded gain or loss, net of tax, on the embedded derivative associated with the conversion feature.

Amounts used in basic and diluted loss per share, for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, are as follows (in thousands):
 
 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Weighted-average number of basic shares outstanding
30,003

 
29,826

 
29,989

 
29,815

Stock options, stock units and performance awards

 

 

 

Convertible senior notes

 

 

 

Total shares and dilutive securities
30,003

 
29,826

 
29,989

 
29,815

For both the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, all outstanding share-based compensation awards were excluded from the calculation of diluted loss per share because their inclusion would be antidilutive due to the net loss in those periods. Also, the effect of our convertible senior notes was excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings (loss) per share since the conversion price exceeded the average price of our common stock during the applicable periods. For information on our convertible senior notes and our share-based compensation awards, refer to Note 8 and Note 11, respectively.
Newly Adopted Accounting Principles
ASU No. 2014-09. In May 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASU 2014-09”), which requires the Company to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. ASU 2014-09 establishes ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. (“ASC 606”). We adopted ASC 606 effective January 1, 2018. ASC 606 replaces most of the previous revenue recognition guidance under GAAP. Most of our contracts with customers are short-term in nature and billed on a time and materials basis, while certain other contracts are at a fixed price. For these fixed price contracts, ASC 606 generally results in the recognition of revenue as the services are provided compared to recognition of revenue at the time of completion of those contracts, under previous guidance. The adoption of ASC 606 has not resulted in significant changes to the overall pattern or timing of our revenue recognition.
To account for the cumulative effect of initially applying ASC 606 as of January 1, 2018, we recognized a pre-tax increase to the opening balance of retained earnings of $8.8 million, pursuant to the modified retrospective transition method, for certain fixed-price contracts that were not yet completed as of the date of adoption. The cumulative effect of adoption resulted in a net increase to prepaid expenses and other current assets of $8.5 million, a reduction to inventory of $0.4 million and a reduction to

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other accrued liabilities of $0.7 million. Also, we recorded the related tax impacts as of January 1, 2018, which resulted in a net reduction to the opening balance of retained earnings of $0.4 million and a corresponding increase to deferred tax liabilities. Because we have applied the modified retrospective transition method of adoption, comparative periods prior to January 1, 2018 were not retrospectively adjusted to reflect adoption of ASU 2014-09 and are presented in accordance with our historical accounting.
The effect of ASC 606 on our condensed consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2018 and our condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 were as follows (in thousands):
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
 
Without adoption of ASC 606
 
Adjustments to apply ASC 606
 
As reported
 
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Effect on condensed consolidated balance sheet
 
 
 
 
 
 
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
 
$
18,009

 
$
12,409

 
$
30,418

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Liabilities and Equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retained earnings
 
$
61,492

 
$
12,409

 
$
73,901

 
 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2018
 
 
Without adoption of ASC 606
 
Adjustments to apply ASC 606
 
As reported
 
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Effect on condensed consolidated statement of operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
 
$
344,356

 
$
(467
)
 
$
343,889

Operating expenses
 
$
246,310

 
$
397

 
$
246,707

Provision (benefit) for income taxes
 
$
(2,439
)
 
$
(538
)
 
$
(2,977
)
Net loss
 
$
(32,144
)
 
$
(326
)
 
$
(32,470
)
 
 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2018
 
 
Without adoption of ASC 606
 
Adjustments to apply ASC 606
 
As reported
 
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Effect on condensed consolidated statement of operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
 
$
641,213

 
$
5,061

 
$
646,274

Operating expenses
 
$
472,112

 
$
1,446

 
$
473,558

Provision (benefit) for income taxes
 
$
(1,995
)
 
$
(359
)
 
$
(2,354
)
Net income (loss)
 
$
(54,289
)
 
$
3,974

 
$
(50,315
)
Refer to Note 2 for additional disclosures required by ASC 606.
ASU No. 2016-15. In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (“ASU 2016-15”), which clarifies the classification in the statement of cash flows of certain items, including debt prepayment or extinguishment costs, settlement of contingent consideration arising from a business combination, insurance settlement proceeds, and cash receipts and payments having aspects of more than one class of cash flows. The adoption of this ASU on January 1, 2018 had no impact on our consolidated statements of cash flows.
ASU No. 2016-16. In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory (“ASU 2016-16”), which requires an entity to recognize the income tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset, other than inventory, when the transfer occurs. Adoption of ASU 2016-16 on January 1, 2018 did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.
ASU No. 2017-07. In March 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-07, Compensation—Retirement Benefits: Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost (“ASU 2017-07”), which prescribes

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where in the statement of operations the components of net periodic pension cost and net periodic postretirement benefit cost should be reported. Under ASU 2017-07, the service cost component is required to be reported in the same line or line items that other compensation costs of the associated employees are reported, while the other components are reported outside of operating income (loss), in the “Other expense, net” line item of our consolidated statements of operations. Adoption of ASU 2017-07 on January 1, 2018 did not have a material impact on our consolidated statements of operations.
ASU No. 2017-09. In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-09, Compensation–Stock Compensation: Scope of Modification Accounting (“ASU 2017-09”), which provides guidance about which changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award require an entity apply modification accounting in Topic 718. Under ASU 2017-09, modification accounting is required unless the effect of the modification does not impact the award’s fair value, vesting conditions and its classification as an equity instrument or liability instrument. Our adoption of ASU 2017-09 on January 1, 2018 on a prospective basis did not have any impact on our share-based compensation expense.
Accounting Principles Not Yet Adopted
ASU No. 2016-02. In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases, which establishes ASC Topic 842, Leases (“ASC 842”), replacing previous lease accounting guidance. ASC 842 changes the accounting for leases, including a requirement to record leases with terms of greater than twelve months on the balance sheet as assets and liabilities. We are continuing to assess the requirements of ASC 842 and the related accounting impacts of our leasing arrangements and are unable to quantify the impacts at this time. However, we expect that, upon adoption of ASC 842, we will recognize significant amounts of right-of-use assets and lease liabilities on our consolidated balance sheet associated with our operating lease arrangements. ASC 842 will also require us to expand our financial statement disclosures on leasing activities. We do not currently anticipate that the adoption will result in significant impacts to our statements of operations or cash flows. ASC 842 is effective for us on January 1, 2019. In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-11, Leases—Targeted Improvements (“ASU 2018-11”), which provides an optional transition method under which entities initially apply ASC 842 at the adoption date and recognize a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the period of adoption. Under this method, the comparative periods presented in the financial statements prior to the adoption date would not be adjusted to apply ASC 842. We intend to elect the optional transition method set forth in ASU 2018-11 in connection with our adoption of ASC 842 on January 1, 2019.
ASU No. 2016-13. In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments–Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (“ASU 2016-13”), which amends GAAP by introducing a new impairment model for financial instruments that is based on expected credit losses rather than incurred credit losses. The new impairment model applies to most financial assets, including trade accounts receivable. ASU 2016-13 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019, although it may be adopted one year earlier, and requires a modified retrospective transition approach. We are currently evaluating the impact this ASU will have on our ongoing financial reporting.
ASU No. 2017-12. In August 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-12, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedge Activities (“ASU 2017-12”). This update makes certain targeted improvements to the accounting and presentation of certain hedging relationships. For net investment hedges, ASU 2017-12 requires that the entire change in the fair value of the hedging instrument included in the assessment of hedge effectiveness be recorded in the currency translation adjustment section of other comprehensive income (loss). ASU 2017-12 is required to be adopted for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. We are currently evaluating the impact this ASU will have on our ongoing financial reporting.
ASU No. 2018-02. In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, Income StatementReporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (“ASU 2018-02”). ASU 2018-02 introduces the option to reclassify from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) to retained earnings the “stranded” tax effects resulting from the 2017 Tax Act. Under GAAP, certain deferred tax assets or liabilities may originate through income tax activity recognized in other comprehensive income (loss). However, because the adjustment of deferred tax assets and liabilities due to the reduction of the historical corporate income tax rate to the newly enacted corporate income tax rate is required to be included in income (loss) from continuing operations, the tax effects of items within accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) are not adjusted to reflect the new tax rate, resulting in “stranded” tax effects. ASU 2018-02 provides an option to reclassify such tax effects from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) to retained earnings. ASU 2018-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. We are currently evaluating whether to elect the option set forth in ASU 2018-02.

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2. REVENUE
As discussed in “Newly Adopted Accounting Principles—ASU No. 2014-09” in Note 1, on January 1, 2018, we adopted ASC 606 using the modified retrospective method, which was applied to those contracts that were not completed as of January 1, 2018.
In accordance with ASC 606, we follow a five-step process to recognize revenue: 1) identify the contract with the customer, 2) identify the performance obligations, 3) determine the transaction price, 4) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations and 5) recognize revenue when the performance obligations are satisfied.
Most of our contracts with customers are short-term in nature and billed on a time and materials basis, while certain other contracts are at a fixed price. Certain contracts may contain a combination of fixed and variable elements. We act as a principal and have performance obligations to provide the service itself or oversee the services provided by any subcontractors. Revenue is measured based on consideration specified in a contract with a customer and excludes amounts collected on behalf of third parties, such as taxes assessed by governmental authorities. In contracts where the amount of consideration is variable, we consider our experience with similar contracts in estimating the amount to which we will be entitled and recognize revenues accordingly. As most of our contracts contain only one performance obligation, the allocation of a contracts transaction price to multiple performance obligations is generally not applicable. Customers are generally billed as we satisfy our performance obligations and payment terms typically range from 30 to 90 days from the invoice date. Billings under certain fixed-price contracts may be based upon the achievement of specified milestones, while some arrangements may require advance customer payment. Our contracts do not include significant financing components since the contracts typically span less than one year. Contracts generally include an assurance type warranty clause to guarantee that the services comply with agreed specifications. The warranty period typically is 12 months or less from the date of service. Warranty expenses were not material for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.
Revenue is recognized as (or when) the performance obligations are satisfied by transferring control over a service or product to the customer. Revenue recognition guidance prescribes two recognition methods (over time or point in time). Most of our performance obligations qualify for recognition over time because we typically perform our services on customer facilities or assets and customers receive the benefits of our services as we perform. Where a performance obligation is satisfied over time, the related revenue is also recognized over time using the method deemed most appropriate to reflect the measure of progress and transfer of control. For our time and materials contracts, we are generally able to elect the right-to-invoice practical expedient, which permits us to recognize revenue in the amount to which we have a right to invoice the customer if that amount corresponds directly with the value to the customer of our performance completed to date. For our fixed price contracts, we typically recognize revenue using the cost-to-cost method, which measures the extent of progress towards completion based on the ratio of costs incurred to date to the total estimated costs at completion of the performance obligation. Under this method, revenue is recognized proportionately as costs are incurred. For contracts where control is transferred at a point in time, revenue is recognized at the time control of the asset is transferred to the customer, which is typically upon delivery and acceptance by the customer.
Disaggregation of revenue. Essentially all of our revenues are associated with contracts with customers. A disaggregation of our revenue from contracts with customers by geographic region, by reportable operating segment and by service type is presented below (in thousands):
 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2018
 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
United States and Canada
 
Other Countries
 
Total
 
United States and Canada
 
Other Countries
 
Total
Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

IHT
$
164,983

 
$
3,690

 
$
168,673

 
$
313,193

 
$
6,899

 
$
320,092

MS
111,964

 
37,014

 
148,978

 
211,788

 
70,091

 
281,879

Quest Integrity
16,990

 
9,248

 
26,238

 
29,700

 
14,603

 
44,303

Total
$
293,937

 
$
49,952

 
$
343,889

 
$
554,681

 
$
91,593

 
$
646,274


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Three Months Ended June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
Asset Integrity Management
 
Repair and Maintenance Services
 
Heat Treating
 
Non-Destructive Evaluation
 
Other
 
Total
Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IHT
$
8,985

 
$
5,037

 
$
22,459

 
$
124,635

 
$
7,557

 
$
168,673

MS
155

 
146,175

 
439

 

 
2,209

 
148,978

Quest Integrity
26,238

 

 

 

 

 
26,238

Total
$
35,378

 
$
151,212

 
$
22,898

 
$
124,635

 
$
9,766

 
$
343,889

 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
Asset Integrity Management
 
Repair and Maintenance Services
 
Heat Treating
 
Non-Destructive Evaluation
 
Other
 
Total
Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IHT
$
18,141

 
$
5,883

 
$
41,755

 
$
239,015

 
$
15,298

 
$
320,092

MS
155

 
277,374

 
943

 

 
3,407

 
281,879

Quest Integrity
44,303

 

 

 

 

 
44,303

Total
$
62,599

 
$
283,257

 
$
42,698

 
$
239,015

 
$
18,705

 
$
646,274


For additional information on our reportable operating segments and geographic information, refer to Note 14.
Contract balances. The timing of revenue recognition, billings and cash collections results in trade accounts receivable, contract assets and contract liabilities on the consolidated balance sheets. Trade accounts receivable include billed and unbilled amounts currently due from customers and represent unconditional rights to receive consideration. The amounts due are stated at their net estimated realizable value. Refer to Notes 1 and 3 for additional information on our trade receivables and the allowance for doubtful accounts. Contract assets include unbilled amounts typically resulting from sales under fixed-price contracts when the cost-to-cost method of revenue recognition is utilized, the revenue recognized exceeds the amount billed to the customer and the right to payment is conditional on something other than the passage of time. Amounts may not exceed their net realizable value. If we receive advances or deposits from our customers, a contract liability is recorded. Additionally, a contract liability arises if items of variable consideration result in less revenue being recorded than what is billed. Contract assets and contract liabilities are generally classified as current.
The following table provides information about trade accounts receivable, contract assets and contract liabilities as of June 30, 2018 and January 1, 2018, the date of adoption of ASC 606, (in thousands):
 
June 30, 2018
 
January 1, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Trade accounts receivable, net1
$
323,169

 
$
301,963

Contract assets2
$
15,685

 
$
9,823

Contract liabilities3
$
3,462

 
$
5,415

_________________
1    Includes billed and unbilled amounts, net of allowance for doubtful accounts. See Note 3 for details.    
2    Included in the “Prepaid expenses and other current assets” line on the condensed consolidated balance sheet.
3    Included in the “Other accrued liabilities” line of the condensed consolidated balance sheet.

The $5.9 million increase in our contract assets from January 1, 2018 to June 30, 2018 was due to additional contracts in process, reflecting higher activity levels. Due to the short-term nature of our contracts, contract liability balances as of the end of any period are generally recognized as revenue in the following quarter.
Contract costs. The Company recognizes the incremental costs of obtaining contracts as selling, general and administrative expenses when incurred if the amortization period of the asset that otherwise would have been recognized is one year or less.

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Assets recognized for costs to obtain a contract were not material as of June 30, 2018 or January 1, 2018. Costs to fulfill a contract are recorded as assets if they relate directly to a contract or a specific anticipated contract, the costs generate or enhance resources that will be used in satisfying performance obligations in the future and the costs are expected to be recovered. Costs to fulfill recognized as assets primarily consist of labor and materials costs and generally relate to engineering and set-up costs incurred prior to the satisfaction of performance obligations begins. Assets recognized for costs to fulfill a contract are included in the “Prepaid expenses and other current assets” line of the condensed consolidated balance sheets and were not material as of June 30, 2018 and January 1, 2018. Such assets are recognized as expenses as we transfer the related goods or services to the customer. All other costs to fulfill a contract are expensed as incurred.
Remaining performance obligations. As of June 30, 2018 and January 1, 2018, there were no material amounts of remaining performance obligations that are required to be disclosed. As permitted by ASC 606, we have elected not to disclose information about remaining performance obligations where i) the performance obligation is part of a contract that has an original expected duration of one year or less or ii) when we recognize revenue from the satisfaction of the performance obligation in accordance with the right-to-invoice practical expedient.

3. RECEIVABLES
A summary of accounts receivable as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 is as follows (in thousands):
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
Trade accounts receivable
$
246,941

 
$
244,133

Unbilled receivables
91,580

 
69,138

Allowance for doubtful accounts
(15,352
)
 
(11,308
)
Total
$
323,169

 
$
301,963

4. INVENTORY
A summary of inventory as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 is as follows (in thousands):
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
Raw materials
$
8,665

 
$
8,707

Work in progress
3,374

 
2,836

Finished goods
40,456

 
38,160

Total
$
52,495

 
$
49,703


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5. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
A summary of property, plant and equipment as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 is as follows (in thousands):
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
Land
$
6,654

 
$
6,698

Buildings and leasehold improvements
49,091

 
47,924

Machinery and equipment
263,535

 
261,343

Furniture and fixtures
9,723

 
9,405

Capitalized ERP system development costs
46,637

 
46,637

Computers and computer software
14,827

 
13,052

Automobiles
4,993

 
5,070

Construction in progress
12,144

 
12,613

Total
407,604

 
402,742

Accumulated depreciation and amortization
(211,842
)
 
(199,523
)
Property, plant, and equipment, net
$
195,762

 
$
203,219


Depreciation expense for the three months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 was $8.8 million and $8.9 million, respectively. Depreciation expense for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 was $18.1 million and $17.6 million, respectively.

6. INTANGIBLE ASSETS
A summary of intangible assets as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 is as follows (in thousands):
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross
Carrying
Amount
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net
Carrying
Amount
 
Gross
Carrying
Amount
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net
Carrying
Amount
Customer relationships
$
175,026

 
$
(44,827
)
 
$
130,199

 
$
175,226

 
$
(38,712
)
 
$
136,514

Non-compete agreements
5,486

 
(4,685
)
 
801

 
5,563

 
(4,509
)
 
1,054

Trade names
24,788

 
(13,456
)
 
11,332

 
24,830

 
(6,211
)
 
18,619

Technology
7,856

 
(4,740
)
 
3,116

 
7,867

 
(4,292
)
 
3,575

Licenses
855

 
(522
)
 
333

 
859

 
(460
)
 
399

Total
$
214,011

 
$
(68,230
)
 
$
145,781

 
$
214,345

 
$
(54,184
)
 
$
160,161

Amortization expense for the three months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 was $7.1 million and $4.2 million, respectively. Amortization expense for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 was $14.3 million and $8.4 million, respectively. With respect to our intangible asset associated with the Furmanite trade name, management has determined that, as a result of initiatives to consolidate the Company’s branding, the useful life of this intangible asset is not expected to extend beyond December 31, 2018. In accordance with ASC 350, we are accounting for the change in useful life prospectively effective January 1, 2018 and are amortizing the remaining balance over 2018. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2018, the change in estimate resulted in $3.1 million, and $6.2 million, respectively, of incremental amortization expense.

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7. OTHER ACCRUED LIABILITIES
A summary of other accrued liabilities as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 is as follows (in thousands):
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
Payroll and other compensation expenses
$
44,912

 
$
40,988

Insurance accruals
14,831

 
15,799

Property, sales and other non-income related taxes
6,409

 
6,483

Lease commitments
1,007

 
1,616

Contract liabilities
3,462

 
6,102

Accrued commission
2,124

 
1,473

Accrued interest
5,237

 
5,950

Volume discount
2,700

 
1,545

Contingent consideration
438

 
1,246

Professional fees
1,432

 
1,098

Other
12,291

 
10,172

Total
$
94,843

 
$
92,472



8. LONG-TERM DEBT, LETTERS OF CREDIT AND DERIVATIVES
As of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, our long-term debt is summarized as follows (in thousands):
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
Credit Facility
$
198,306

 
$
177,857

Convertible debt1
192,175

 
209,892

Total long-term debt
390,481

 
387,749

Less: current portion of long-term debt

 

Total long-term debt, less current portion
$
390,481

 
$
387,749

_________________
1
Comprised of principal amount outstanding plus embedded derivative liability (if any), less unamortized discount and issuance costs. See Convertible Debt section below for additional information.
Credit Facility
In July 2015, we renewed our banking credit facility (the “Credit Facility”). In accordance with the second amendment to the Credit Facility, which was signed in February 2016, the Credit Facility had a borrowing capacity of up to $600 million and consisted of a $400 million, five-year revolving loan facility and a $200 million five-year term loan facility. The swing line facility is $35.0 million. On July 31, 2017, we completed the issuance of $230.0 million of 5.00% convertible senior notes in a private offering (the “Offering,” which is described further below) and used the proceeds from the Offering to repay in full the then-outstanding term-loan portion of our Credit Facility and a portion of the outstanding revolving borrowings. Concurrent with the completion of the Offering and the repayment of outstanding borrowings discussed above, we entered into the sixth amendment to the Credit Facility, effective as of June 30, 2017, which reduced the capacity of the Credit Facility to a $300 million revolving loan facility, subject to a borrowing availability test (based on eligible accounts, inventory and fixed assets). The Credit Facility matures in July 2020, bears interest based on a variable Eurodollar rate option (LIBOR plus 3.75% margin at June 30, 2018) and has commitment fees on unused borrowing capacity (0.75% at June 30, 2018). The Credit Facility limits our ability to pay cash dividends. The Company’s obligations under the Credit Facility are guaranteed by its material direct and indirect domestic subsidiaries and are secured by a lien on substantially all of the Company’s and the guarantors’ tangible and intangible property (subject to certain specified exclusions) and by a pledge of all of the equity interests in the Company’s material direct and indirect domestic subsidiaries and 65% of the equity interests in the Company’s material first-tier foreign subsidiaries.
The Credit Facility contains financial covenants, which were amended in March 2018 pursuant to the seventh amendment (the “Seventh Amendment”) to the Credit Facility. The Seventh Amendment eliminated the ratio of consolidated funded debt to

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consolidated EBITDA (the “Total Leverage Ratio,” as defined in the Credit Facility agreement) covenant through the remainder of the term of the Credit Facility and also modified both the ratio of senior secured debt to consolidated EBITDA (the “Senior Secured Leverage Ratio,” as defined in the Credit Facility agreement) and the ratio of consolidated EBITDA to consolidated interest charges (the “Interest Coverage Ratio,” as defined in the Credit Facility agreement) as follows. The Company is required to maintain a maximum Senior Secured Leverage Ratio of not more than 4.25 to 1.00 as of June 30, 2018, not more than 3.50 to 1.00 as of September 30, 2018 and each quarter thereafter through June 30, 2019 and not more than 2.75 to 1.00 as of September 30, 2019 and each quarter thereafter. With respect to the Interest Coverage Ratio, the Company is required to maintain a ratio of not less than 2.25 to 1.00 as of June 30, 2018 and each quarter thereafter through December 31, 2018 and not less than 2.50 to 1.00 as of March 31, 2019 and each quarter thereafter. As of June 30, 2018, we are in compliance with the covenants in effect as of such date. The Senior Secured Leverage Ratio and the Interest Coverage Ratio stood at 2.95 to 1.00 and 3.19 to 1.00, respectively, as of June 30, 2018. At June 30, 2018, we had $15.3 million of cash on hand and had approximately $80 million of available borrowing capacity through our Credit Facility. As of June 30, 2018, we had $2.4 million of unamortized debt issuance costs that are being amortized over the life of the Credit Facility.
Our ability to maintain compliance with the financial covenants is dependent upon our future operating performance and future financial condition, both of which are subject to various risks and uncertainties. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that we will be able to maintain compliance with the Credit Facility covenants as of any future date. In the event we are unable to maintain compliance with our financial covenants, we would seek to enter into an amendment to the Credit Facility with our bank group in order to modify and/or to provide relief from the financial covenants for an additional period of time. Although we have entered into amendments in the past, there can be no assurance that any future amendments would be available on terms acceptable to us, if at all.
In order to secure our casualty insurance programs we are required to post letters of credit generally issued by a bank as collateral. A letter of credit commits the issuer to remit specified amounts to the holder, if the holder demonstrates that we failed to meet our obligations under the letter of credit. If this were to occur, we would be obligated to reimburse the issuer for any payments the issuer was required to remit to the holder of the letter of credit. We were contingently liable for outstanding stand-by letters of credit totaling $21.8 million at June 30, 2018 and $22.5 million at December 31, 2017. Outstanding letters of credit reduce amounts available under our Credit Facility and are considered as having been funded for purposes of calculating our financial covenants under the Credit Facility.

Convertible Debt

Description of the Notes

On July 31, 2017, we issued $230.0 million principal amount of 5.00% Convertible Senior Notes due 2023 (the “Notes”). The Notes, which are senior unsecured obligations of the Company, bear interest at rate of 5.0% per year, payable semiannually in arrears on February 1 and August 1 of each year, beginning on February 1, 2018. The Notes will mature on August 1, 2023 unless repurchased, redeemed or converted in accordance with their terms prior to such date. The Notes will be convertible at an initial conversion rate of 46.0829 shares of our common stock per $1,000 principal amount of the Notes, which is equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $21.70 per share. The conversion rate, and thus the conversion price, may be adjusted under certain circumstances as described in the indenture governing the Notes.
    
Holders may convert their Notes at their option prior to the close of business on the business day immediately preceding May 1, 2023, but only under the following circumstances:

during any calendar quarter commencing after the calendar quarter ending on December 31, 2017 (and only during such calendar quarter), if the last reported sale price of our common stock for at least 20 trading days (whether or not consecutive) during a period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on the last trading day of the immediately preceding calendar quarter is greater than or equal to 130% of the conversion price on each applicable trading day;

during the five business day period after any five consecutive trading day period (the “measurement period”) in which the trading price per $1,000 principal amount of Notes for each trading day of such measurement period was less than 98% of the product of the last reported sale price of our common stock and the conversion rate on such trading day;

if we call any or all of the Notes for redemption, at any time prior to the close of business on the business day immediately preceding the redemption date; or;

upon the occurrence of specified corporate events described in the indenture governing the Notes.


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On or after May 1, 2023 until the close of business on the business day immediately preceding the maturity date, holders may, at their option, convert their Notes at any time, regardless of the foregoing circumstances.

The Notes are initially convertible into 10,599,067 shares of common stock. Because the Notes could be convertible in full into more than 19.99 percent of our outstanding common stock, we were required by the listing rules of the New York Stock Exchange to obtain the approval of the holders of our outstanding shares of common stock before the Notes could be converted into more than 5,964,858 shares of common stock. At our annual shareholders’ meeting, held on May 17, 2018, our shareholders approved the issuance of shares of common stock upon conversion of the Notes. The Notes will be convertible into, subject to various conditions, cash or shares of the Company’s common stock or a combination of cash and shares of the Company’s common stock, in each case, at the Company’s election.

If holders elect to convert the Notes in connection with certain fundamental change transactions described in the indenture governing the Notes, we will, under certain circumstances described in the indenture governing the Notes, increase the conversion rate for the Notes so surrendered for conversion.
We may not redeem the Notes prior to August 5, 2021. We will have the option to redeem all or any portion of the Notes on or after August 5, 2021, if certain conditions (including that our common stock is trading at or above 130% of the conversion price then in effect for at least 20 trading days (whether or not consecutive)), including the trading day immediately preceding the date on which the Company provides notice of redemption, during any 30 consecutive trading day period ending on, and including, the trading day immediately preceding the date on which the Company provides notice of redemption at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the Notes to be redeemed, plus accrued and unpaid interest to, but excluding, the redemption date.

Accounting Treatment of the Notes

As of June 30, 2018, the Notes were recorded in our condensed consolidated balance sheets as follows (in thousands):
 
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
Liability component:
 
 
 
Principal
$
230,000

 
$
230,000

Unamortized issuance costs
(6,338
)
 
(6,820
)
Unamortized discount
(31,487
)
 
(33,882
)
Net carrying amount of the liability component
192,175

 
189,298

Embedded derivative liability1

 
20,594

Total2
$
192,175

 
$
209,892

 
 
 
 
Equity component:
 
 
 
Carrying amount of the equity component, net of issuance costs3
$
13,912

 
$
13,912

_________________
1
The embedded derivative liability was reclassified to stockholders’ equity as of May 17, 2018 and is no longer marked to fair value each period, as discussed further below. It is excluded from the table above as of June 30, 2018.
2
Included in the “Long-term debt” line of the condensed consolidated balance sheets.
3
Relates to the portion of the Notes accounted for under ASC 470-20 (defined below) and is included in the “Additional paid-in capital” line of the condensed consolidated balance sheets.    

Under ASC 470-20, Debt with Conversion and Other Options, (“ASC 470-20”), an entity must separately account for the liability and equity components of convertible debt instruments that may be settled entirely or partially in cash upon conversion (such as the Notes) in a manner that reflects the issuer’s economic interest cost. However, entities must first consider the guidance in ASC 815-15, Embedded Derivatives (“ASC 815-15”), to determine if an instrument contains an embedded feature that should be separately accounted for as a derivative. We applied this guidance as of the issuance date of the Notes and concluded that for the conversion feature for a portion of the Notes, we must recognize an embedded derivative under ASC 815-15, while the remainder of the Notes is subject to ASC 470-20.
The Company determined the portions of the Notes subject to ASC 815-15 and ASC 470-20 as follows. First, while the Notes are initially convertible into 10,599,067 shares of common stock, the occurrence of certain corporate events could increase

17

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the conversion rate, which could result in the Notes becoming convertible into a maximum of 14,838,703 shares. As of the issuance date of the Notes, 5,964,858 shares, or approximately 40% of the maximum number of shares, was authorized for issuance without shareholder approval, while 8,873,845 shares, or approximately 60%, would have been required to be settled in cash. Therefore, the Company concluded that embedded derivative accounting under ASC 815-15 was applicable to approximately 60% of the Notes, while the remaining 40% of the Notes was subject to ASC 470-20. As a result of obtaining shareholder approval for the issuance of shares of common stock upon conversion of the Notes, the embedded derivative meets the criteria to be classified in stockholders’ equity, effective on the date of shareholder approval. Accordingly, we recorded the change in fair value of the embedded derivative liability in our results of operations through the shareholder approval date of May 17, 2018 and then reclassified the embedded derivative liability to stockholders’ equity at its May 17, 2018 fair value of $45.4 million. The related income tax effects of the reclassification charged directly to stockholders’ equity were $7.8 million. As a result of the reclassification to stockholders’ equity, the embedded derivative will no longer be marked to fair value each period. Losses on the embedded derivative liability recognized in the condensed consolidated statements of operations were $29.3 million and $24.8 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018.
The following table sets forth interest expense information related to the Notes (in thousands, except percentage):
 
Three Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Coupon interest
$
2,875

 
$
5,750

Amortization of debt discount and issuance costs
1,450

 
2,878

    Total interest expense on convertible senior notes
$
4,325

 
$
8,628

 
 
 
 
Effective interest rate
9.12
%
 
9.12
%

As of June 30, 2018, the remaining amortization period for the debt discount and issuance costs is 61 months.
Derivatives and Hedging

ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging (“ASC 815”), requires that derivative instruments be recorded at fair value and included in the balance sheet as assets or liabilities. The accounting for changes in the fair value of a derivative instrument depends on the intended use of the derivative and the resulting designation, which is established at the inception date of a derivative. Special accounting for derivatives qualifying as fair value hedges allows derivatives’ gains and losses to offset related results on the hedged item in the statement of operations. For derivative instruments designated as cash flow hedges, changes in fair value, to the extent the hedge is effective, are recognized in other comprehensive income (loss) until the hedged item is recognized in earnings. Hedge effectiveness is measured at least quarterly based on the relative cumulative changes in fair value between the derivative contract and the hedged item over time. Credit risks related to derivatives include the possibility that the counter-party will not fulfill the terms of the contract. We consider counterparty credit risk to our derivative contracts when valuing our derivative instruments.
Our borrowing of €12.3 million under the Credit Facility serves as an economic hedge of our net investment in our European operations as fluctuations in the fair value of the borrowing attributable to the U.S. Dollar/Euro spot rate will offset translation gains or losses attributable to our investment in our European operations. At June 30, 2018, the €12.3 million borrowing had a U.S. Dollar value of $14.4 million.
As discussed above, we previously recorded an embedded derivative liability for a portion of the Notes. In accordance with ASC 815-15, the embedded derivative instrument was recorded at fair value each period with changes in fair value reflected in our results of operations. No hedge accounting was applied. As a result of obtaining shareholder approval for the issuance of shares upon conversion of the Notes, we recorded the change in fair value of the embedded derivative liability in our results of operations through the shareholder approval date of May 17, 2018 and then reclassified the embedded derivative liability to stockholders’ equity at its May 17, 2018 fair value of $45.4 million. As a result of the reclassification to stockholders’ equity, the embedded derivative will no longer be marked to fair value each period. See Note 10 for more information on the fair value measurement of the embedded derivative liability.

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The amounts recognized in other comprehensive income (loss), reclassified into income (loss) and the amounts recognized in income (loss) for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, are as follows (in thousands):
 
 
Gain (Loss)
Recognized in
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Gain (Loss)
Reclassified from
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss) to
Earnings
 
Gain (Loss)
Recognized in
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Gain (Loss)
Reclassified from
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss) to
Earnings
 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
Derivatives Classified as Hedging Instruments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment hedge
$
788

 
$
(949
)
 
$

 
$

 
$
367

 
$
(1,115
)
 
$

 
$

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gain (Loss) Recognized in Income (Loss)1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
Derivatives Not Classified as Hedging Instruments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Embedded derivative in convertible debt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
(29,330
)
 
$

 
$
(24,783
)
 
$

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
_________________
1    Reflected as “Loss on convertible debt embedded derivative” in the condensed consolidated statements of operations.
The following table presents the fair value totals and balance sheet classification for derivatives designated as hedges and derivatives not designated as hedges under ASC 815 (in thousands):
 
 
June 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Classification
 
Balance Sheet
Location
 
Fair
Value
 
Classification
 
Balance Sheet
Location
 
Fair
Value
Derivatives Classified as Hedging Instruments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment hedge
Liability
 
Long-term debt
 
$
(3,613
)
 
Liability
 
Long-term debt
 
$
(3,246
)
Derivatives Not Classified as Hedging Instruments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Embedded derivative in convertible debt
Liability
 
Long-term debt
 
$

 
Liability
 
Long-term debt
 
$
20,594



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9. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS
We have defined benefit pension plans in two foreign subsidiaries, one plan covering certain United Kingdom employees (the “U.K. Plan”) and the other covering certain Norwegian employees (the “Norwegian Plan”). As the Norwegian Plan represents approximately one percent of both the Company’s total pension plan liabilities and total pension plan assets, only the schedule of net periodic pension credit includes combined amounts from the two plans, while assumption and narrative information relates solely to the U.K. Plan.
Net periodic pension credit for the U.K. and Norwegian Plans includes the following components (in thousands):
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Service cost
$
23

 
$
4

 
$
47

 
$
8

Interest cost
588

 
597

 
1,189

 
1,176

Expected return on plan assets
(948
)
 
(761
)
 
(1,918
)
 
(1,499
)
Amortization of net actuarial loss

 
17

 

 
34

Net periodic pension credit
$
(337
)
 
$
(143
)
 
$
(682
)
 
$
(281
)

The expected long-term rate of return on invested assets is determined based on the weighted average of expected returns on asset investment categories as follows: 4.7% overall, 5.8% for equities and 1.8% for debt securities. We expect to contribute $2.5 million to the pension plan for 2018, of which $1.2 million has been contributed through June 30, 2018.
10. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
We apply the provisions of ASC 820, which among other things, requires certain disclosures about assets and liabilities carried at fair value.
As defined in ASC 820, fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. We utilize market data or assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk and the risks inherent in the inputs to the valuation technique. These inputs can be readily observable, market corroborated, or generally unobservable. We primarily apply the market approach for recurring fair value measurements and endeavor to utilize the best information available. Accordingly, we utilize valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. The use of unobservable inputs is intended to allow for fair value determinations in situations in which there is little, if any, market activity for the asset or liability at the measurement date. We are able to classify fair value balances based on the observability of those inputs. ASC 820 establishes a fair value hierarchy such that “Level 1” measurements include unadjusted quoted market prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market, “Level 2” measurements include quoted market prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market which have been adjusted for items such as effects of restrictions for transferability and those that are not quoted but are observable through corroboration with observable market data, including quoted market prices for similar assets, and “Level 3” measurements include those that are unobservable and of a highly subjective measure.

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The following table sets forth, by level within the fair value hierarchy, our financial assets and liabilities that are accounted for at fair value on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017. As required by ASC 820, financial assets and liabilities are classified in their entirety based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement (in thousands):
 
June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
Quoted Prices
in Active
Markets for
Identical
Items (Level 1)
 
Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs (Level 2)
 
Significant
Unobservable
Inputs (Level 3)
 
Total
Liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Contingent consideration1
$

 
$

 
$
438

 
$
438

Net investment hedge
$

 
$
(3,613
)
 
$

 
$
(3,613
)
Embedded derivative in convertible debt2
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
December 31, 2017
 
Quoted Prices
in Active
Markets for
Identical
Items (Level 1)
 
Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs (Level 2)
 
Significant
Unobservable
Inputs (Level 3)
 
Total
Liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Contingent consideration1
$

 
$

 
$
1,712

 
$
1,712

Net investment hedge
$

 
$
(3,246
)
 
$

 
$
(3,246
)
Embedded derivative in convertible debt2
$

 
$
20,594

 
$

 
$
20,594

__________________________
1
Inclusive of both current and noncurrent portions.
2
The embedded derivative liability was reclassified to stockholders’ equity as of May 17, 2018 and is no longer marked to fair value each period, as discussed in Note 8.

There were no transfers in and out of Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 during the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.
The fair value of the convertible debt embedded derivative liability was estimated using a lattice model with inputs including our stock price, our stock price volatility and interest rates. As the assumptions used in the valuation are primarily derived from observable market data, the fair value measurement was classified as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy. See Note 8 for more information on the embedded derivative liability.
The fair value of contingent consideration liabilities classified in the table above were estimated using a discounted cash flow technique with significant inputs that are not observable in the market and thus represents a Level 3 fair value measurement as defined in ASC 820. The significant inputs in the Level 3 measurement not supported by market activity include a combination of actual cash flows and probability-weighted assessments of expected future cash flows related to the acquired businesses, appropriately discounted considering the uncertainties associated with the obligation, and as calculated in accordance with the terms of the acquisition agreements.
The following table represents the changes in the fair value of Level 3 contingent consideration liabilities (in thousands):
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
Balance, beginning of period
$
1,712

Accretion of liability
39

Foreign currency effects
(5
)
Payment
(1,106
)
Revaluation
(202
)
Balance, end of period
$
438


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11. SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION
We have adopted stock incentive plans and other arrangements pursuant to which our Board of Directors (the “Board”) may grant stock options, restricted stock, stock units, stock appreciation rights, common stock or performance awards to officers, directors and key employees. At June 30, 2018, there were approximately 1.6 million restricted stock units, performance awards and stock options outstanding to officers, directors and key employees. The exercise price, terms and other conditions applicable to each form of share-based compensation under our plans are generally determined by the Compensation Committee of our Board at the time of grant and may vary.
Our share-based payments consist primarily of stock units, performance awards, common stock and stock options. In May 2018, our shareholders approved the 2018 Team, Inc. Equity Incentive Plan (the “2018 Plan”), which replaces the 2016 Team, Inc. Equity Incentive Plan (the “2016 Plan”). The 2018 Plan authorizes the issuance of share-based awards representing up to 450,000 shares of common stock, plus the number of shares remaining available for issuance under the 2016 Plan, plus the number of shares subject to outstanding awards under specified prior plans that may become available for reissuance in certain circumstances. Shares issued in connection with our share-based compensation are issued out of authorized but unissued common stock.
Compensation expense related to share-based compensation totaled $7.0 million and $4.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Share-based compensation expense reflects an estimate of expected forfeitures. At June 30, 2018, $17.5 million of unrecognized compensation expense related to share-based compensation is expected to be recognized over a remaining weighted-average period of 2.2 years. The excess tax benefit derived when share-based awards result in a tax deduction for the Company was not material for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.
Stock units are settled with common stock upon vesting unless it is not legally feasible to issue shares, in which case the value of the award is settled in cash. We determine the fair value of each stock unit based on the market price on the date of grant. Stock units generally vest in annual installments over four years and the expense associated with the units is recognized over the same vesting period. We also grant common stock to our directors, which typically vests immediately. Compensation expense related to stock units and director stock grants totaled $5.2 million and $3.8 million for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.
Transactions involving our stock units and director stock grants during the six months ended June 30, 2018 are summarized below:
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
No. of Stock
Units
 
Weighted
Average
Fair Value
 
(in thousands)
 
 
Stock and stock units, beginning of period
854

 
$
21.42

Changes during the period:
 
 
 
Granted
40

 
$
19.85

Vested and settled
(65
)
 
$
20.40

Cancelled
(13
)
 
$
20.85

Stock and stock units, end of period
816

 
$
21.37

We have a performance stock unit award program whereby we grant Long-Term Performance Stock Unit (“LTPSU”) awards to our executive officers. Under this program, the Company communicates “target awards” to the executive officers at the beginning of a performance period. LTPSU awards cliff vest with the achievement of the performance goals and completion of the required service period. Settlement occurs with common stock as soon as practicable following the vesting date. LTPSU awards granted on October 15, 2015 are subject to a three-year performance period and a concurrent three-year service period. The performance target is based on results of operations over the three-year performance period with possible payouts ranging from 0% to 300% of the target awards. LTPSU awards granted on March 15, 2017 and March 21, 2018 are subject to a two-year performance period and a concurrent two-year service period. For March 15, 2017 awards, the performance goal is separated into three independent performance factors based on (i) relative total shareholder total return (“RTSR”) as measured against a designated peer group, (ii) RTSR as measured against a designated index and (iii) results of operations over the two-year performance period, with possible payouts ranging from 0% to 200% of the target awards for the first two performance factors and ranging from 0% to 300% of the target awards for the third performance factor. For the March 21, 2018 awards, the performance goal is separated into two independent performance factors based on (i) RTSR as measured against a designated peer group and (ii) results of operations

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Table of Contents

over the two-year performance period, with possible payouts ranging from 0% to 200% of the target awards for each of the two performance factors.
On January 24, 2018, we granted 350,000 performance units to our Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) that vest in 20% increments upon the achievement of five specified Company stock price milestones, subject to a minimum vesting period of one year and the provision of service through each of the vesting dates. Settlement occurs with common stock within 30 days of the respective vesting dates. Any outstanding unvested performance units are forfeited on the fifth anniversary of the grant date.
The RTSR and the stock price milestone factors are considered to be market conditions under GAAP. For performance units subject to market conditions, we determine the fair value of the performance units based on the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, which uses market-based inputs as of the date of grant to simulate future stock returns. Compensation expense for awards with market conditions is recognized on a straight-line basis over the longer of (i) the minimum required service period and (ii) the service period derived from the Monte Carlo simulation, separately for each vesting tranche. For performance units subject to market conditions, because the expected outcome is incorporated into the grant date fair value through the Monte Carlo simulation, compensation expense is not subsequently adjusted for changes in the expected or actual performance outcome. For performance units not subject to market conditions, we determine the fair value of each performance unit based on the market price of our common stock on the date of grant. For these awards, we recognize compensation expense over the vesting term on a straight-line basis based upon the performance target that is probable of being met, subject to adjustment for changes in the expected or actual performance outcome. Compensation expense related to performance awards totaled $1.8 million and $0.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.
Transactions involving our performance awards during the six months ended June 30, 2018 are summarized below:
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
Performance Units Subject to Market Conditions
 
Performance Units Not Subject to Market Conditions
 
No. of Stock
Units1
 
Weighted
Average
Fair Value
 
No. of Stock
Units1
 
Weighted
Average
Fair Value
 
(in thousands)
 
 
 
(in thousands)
 
 
Performance stock units, beginning of period
45

 
$
17.66

 
84

 
$
25.76

Changes during the period:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Granted
455

 
$
14.01

 
105

 
$
14.35

Vested and settled

 
$

 
(15
)
 
$
13.45

Cancelled

 
$

 

 
$

Performance stock units, end of period
500

 
$
14.33

 
174

 
$
19.91

_________________
1
Performance units with variable payouts are shown at target level of performance.


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Table of Contents

We determine the fair value of each stock option at the grant date using a Black-Scholes model and recognize the resulting expense of our stock option awards over the period during which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the awards, usually the vesting period. Compensation expense related to stock options for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 was not material. Our options typically vest in equal annual installments over a four-year service period. Expense related to an option grant is recognized on a straight line basis over the specified vesting period for those options. Stock options generally have a ten-year term. Transactions involving our stock options during the six months ended June 30, 2018 are summarized below:
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
(unaudited)
 
No. of
Options
 
Weighted
Average
Exercise Price
 
(in thousands)
 
 
Shares under option, beginning of period
79

 
$
31.94

Changes during the period:
 
 
 
Granted

 
$

Exercised

 
$

Cancelled

 
$

Expired
(11
)
 
$
32.42

Shares under option, end of period
68

 
$
31.86

Exercisable at end of period
68

 
$
31.86

Options exercisable at June 30, 2018 had a weighted-average remaining contractual life of 3.9 years, and exercise prices ranged from $21.12 to $50.47.


12. ACCUMULATED OTHER COMPREHENSIVE LOSS
A summary of changes in accumulated other comprehensive loss included within shareholders’ equity is as follows (in thousands):
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
Foreign
Currency
Translation
Adjustments
 
Foreign
Currency
Hedge
 
Defined Benefit Pension Plans
 
Tax
Provision
 
Total
 
Foreign
Currency
Translation
Adjustments
 
Foreign
Currency
Hedge
 
Defined Benefit Pension Plans
 
Tax
Provision
 
Total
Balance, beginning of period
$
(21,366
)
 
$
3,246

 
$
(7,221
)
 
$
5,545

 
$
(19,796
)
 
$
(31,973
)
 
$
5,048

 
$
(10,518
)
 
$
8,443

 
$
(29,000
)
Other comprehensive income (loss)
(4,935
)
 
367

 

 
790

 
(3,778
)
 
6,556

 
(1,115
)
 
34

 
(1,230
)
 
4,245

Balance, end of period
$
(26,301
)
 
$
3,613

 
$
(7,221
)
 
$
6,335

 
$
(23,574
)
 
$
(25,417
)
 
$
3,933

 
$
(10,484
)
 
$
7,213

 
$
(24,755
)
The following table represents the related tax effects allocated to each component of other comprehensive income (loss) (in thousands):
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2018
 
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
Gross
Amount
 
Tax
Effect
 
Net
Amount
 
Gross
Amount
 
Tax
Effect
 
Net
Amount
Foreign currency translation adjustments
$
(4,935
)
 
$
892

 
$
(4,043
)
 
$
6,556

 
$
(1,649
)
 
$
4,907

Foreign currency hedge
367

 
(102
)
 
265

 
(1,115
)
 
426

 
(689
)
Defined benefit pension plans

 

 

 
34

 
(7
)
 
27

Total
$
(4,568
)
 
$
790

 
$
(3,778
)
 
$
5,475

 
$
(1,230
)
 
$
4,245


24

Table of Contents

13. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Con Ed Matter—We have, from time to time, provided temporary leak repair services to the steam system of Consolidated Edison Company of New York (“Con Ed”) located in New York City. In July 2007, a Con Ed steam main located in midtown Manhattan ruptured resulting in one death and other injuries and property damage. As of June 30, 2018, eighty-three lawsuits are currently pending against Con Ed, the City of New York and Team in the Supreme Court of New York, alleging that our temporary leak repair services may have contributed to the cause of the rupture, allegations which we dispute. The lawsuits seek generally unspecified compensatory damages for personal injury, property damage and business interruption. Additionally, Con Ed is alleging that our contract with Con Ed requires us to fully indemnify and defend Con Ed for all claims asserted against Con Ed including those amounts that Con Ed has paid to settle with certain plaintiffs for undisclosed sums as well as Con Ed’s own alleged damages to its infrastructure. Con Ed filed an action to join Team and the City of New York as defendants in all lawsuits filed against Con Ed that did not include Team and the City of New York as direct defendants. We are vigorously defending the lawsuits and Con Ed’s claim for indemnification. We are unable to estimate the amount of liability to us, if any, associated with these lawsuits and the claim for indemnification. We filed a motion to dismiss in April 2016. We maintain insurance coverage, subject to a deductible limit of $250,000, which we believe should cover these claims. We have not accrued any liability in excess of the deductible limit for the lawsuits. We do not believe the ultimate outcome of these matters will have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.
Patent Infringement Matters—In December 2014, our subsidiary, Quest Integrity Group, LLC, filed three patent infringement lawsuits against three different defendants, two in the U.S. District of Delaware (the “Delaware Cases”) and one in the U.S. District of Western Washington (the “Washington Case”). Quest Integrity alleges that the three defendants infringed Quest Integrity’s patent, entitled “2D and 3D Display System and Method for Furnace Tube Inspection”. This Quest Integrity patent generally teaches a system and method for displaying inspection data collected during the inspection of furnace tubes in petroleum and petro-chemical refineries. The subject patent litigation is specific to the visual display of the collected data and does not relate to Quest Integrity’s underlying advanced inspection technology. In these lawsuits Quest Integrity is seeking temporary and permanent injunctive relief, as well as monetary damages. Defendants have denied they infringe any valid claim of Quest Integrity’s patent, and have asserted declaratory judgment counterclaims that the patent at issue is invalid and/or unenforceable, and not infringed. In June 2015, the U.S. District of Delaware denied our motions for preliminary injunctive relief in the Delaware Cases (that is, our request that the defendants stop using our patented systems and methods during the pendency of the actions). In March 2017, the judge in the Delaware Cases granted summary judgment against Quest Integrity, finding certain patent claims of the asserted patent invalid. In August 2017, the judge in the Washington Case granted summary judgment against Quest Integrity based on the Delaware Cases ruling. Quest Integrity is in the process of appealing both Delaware Cases and the Washington Case.
We are involved in various other lawsuits and are subject to various claims and proceedings encountered in the normal conduct of business. In our opinion, any uninsured losses that might arise from these lawsuits and proceedings will not have a materially adverse effect on our consolidated financial statements.
We establish a liability for loss contingencies, when information available to us indicates that it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated.
14. SEGMENT AND GEOGRAPHIC DISCLOSURES
ASC 280, Segment Reporting, requires us to disclose certain information about our operating segments where operating segments are defined as “components of an enterprise about which separate financial information is available that is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker in deciding how to allocate resources and in assessing performance.” We conduct operations in three segments: IHT, MS and Quest Integrity.
In July 2018, we announced an organizational restructuring and certain new leadership appointments. The organizational changes will include a Product and Service Line organization and an Operations organization. The Product and Service Lines will be responsible for value positioning and pricing, standardization of best practices, technical training and program development, and technology innovation across Team’s global enterprise. The Operations organization, comprised of cross-segment divisions aligned by major geographic regions, will be responsible for executing product and service delivery in accordance with established Team service line standards, safety and quality protocols. The Company is currently working to transition its operations, management structure, support functions and technology infrastructure to align with the new organization, which we expect to be fully operational in the fourth quarter of 2018. It is possible that our reportable segments could be affected by these changes once the transition is complete. Management is currently evaluating the potential impacts of these changes on the Company’s segment reporting.

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Table of Contents

Segment data for our three operating segments are as follows (in thousands):
 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IHT
$
168,673

 
$
158,412

 
$
320,092

 
$
301,368

MS
148,978

 
132,564

 
281,879

 
254,386

Quest Integrity
26,238

 
21,280

 
44,303

 
43,056

Total
$
343,889

 
$
312,256

 
$
646,274

 
$
598,810


 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Operating income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IHT
$
13,281

 
$
10,529

 
$
20,021

 
$
18,654

MS
10,582

 
5,385

 
13,100

 
5,836

Quest Integrity
5,751

 
3,889

 
6,845

 
8,080

Corporate and shared support services
(27,815
)
 
(26,496
)
 
(52,292
)
 
(51,351
)
Total
$
1,799

 
$
(6,693
)
 
$
(12,326
)
 
$
(18,781
)


 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Capital expenditures:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IHT
$
2,063

 
$
2,852

 
$
4,398

 
$
5,364

MS
2,369

 
3,580

 
4,025

 
7,900

Quest Integrity
1,031

 
827

 
1,652

 
1,273

Corporate and shared support services
1,132

 
685

 
2,007

 
4,125

Total
$
6,595

 
$
7,944

 
$
12,082

 
$
18,662

 
 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Depreciation and amortization:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IHT
$
4,725

 
$
4,861

 
$
9,530

 
$
9,716

MS
8,944

 
5,797

 
18,222

 
11,660

Quest Integrity
966

 
1,096

 
1,965

 
2,365

Corporate and shared support services
1,344

 
1,300

 
2,717

 
2,274

Total
$
15,979

 
$
13,054

 
$
32,434

 
$
26,015

Separate measures of Team’s assets by operating segment are not produced or utilized by management to evaluate segment performance.

26

Table of Contents

A geographic breakdown of our revenues for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 is as follows (in thousands):
 
Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
 
(unaudited)
Total Revenues: 1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
United States
$
242,773

 
$
226,035

 
$
476,149

 
$
441,247

Canada
51,164

 
37,444

 
78,532

 
64,692

Europe
32,471

 
30,229